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Dr Taylor is an board certified orthopedic surgeon, specializing in sports medicine, shoulder, knee arthroscopy & shoulder replacement.

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Shoulder

Normal Anatomy of the Shoulder Joint

How does the Shoulder joint work?

Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement

Reverse total shoulder replacement, is an advanced surgical technique specifically designed for rotator cuff tear arthropathy, a condition where the patient suffers from both shoulder arthritis and a rotator cuff tear.

For more information about Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement, click on below tab.

Potential Complications of Rotator Cuff Surgery

Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a very successful procedure to relieve pain and improve function of the shoulder. Complications are relatively uncommon considering the complexity of the surgery.

For more information about potential complications of rotator cuff surgery, click on below tabs.

Recovery From Rotator Cuff Surgery

When you first get home, you will have a large bulky dressing on the shoulder. Do not get this wet. Do not change the dressing, we will do this for you at your first appointment 3-4 days after the surgery. Then, typically we put band aids on the poke holes and allow you to shower over the band aids. Sponge baths until then!

For more information about recovery from rotator cuff surgery, click on below tabs.

Rotator Cuff

The shoulder is a strange joint. It is actually three joints–the gleno-humeral (or ball and socket) joint, the acromio-clavicular joint (where the collar bone attaches to the shoulder), and the scapulo-thoracic joint (where the shoulder blade moves on the back of the rib cage).

For more information about rotator cuff tear, click on below tabs.

Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder impingement is also called as swimmer’s shoulder, tennis shoulder, or rotator cuff tendinitis. It is the condition of inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder joint caused by motor vehicle accidents, trauma, and while playing sports such as tennis, baseball, swimming and weight lifting.

For more information about shoulder impingement, click on below tabs.

Shoulder Arthroscopy

Shoulder arthroscopy is a surgical procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into the shoulder joint. The benefits of arthroscopy are smaller incisions, faster healing, a more rapid recovery, and less scarring. Arthroscopic surgical procedures are often performed on an outpatient basis and the patient is able to return home on the same day.

For more information about shoulder arthroscopy, click on below tabs.

Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder is a condition of painful shoulder with limited movement because of pain and inflammation. It is also reffered as adhesive capsulitis and may progress to the state where an individual may feel very hard to move the shoulder.

For more information about frozen shoulder, click on below tabs.

Shoulder Joint Replacement

Shoulder joint replacements are usually done to relieve pain and when all non-operative treatment to relieve pain have failed.

For more information about shoulder joint replacement, click on below tabs.

Shoulder Instability

Shoulder instability is a chronic condition that causes frequent dislocations of the shoulder joint. A dislocation occurs when the end of the humerus (the ball portion) partially or completely dislocates from the glenoid (the socket portion) of the shoulder. A partial dislocation is referred as subluxation, whereas the complete separation is referred as dislocation.

For more information about shoulder instability, click on below tabs.

Labral Surgery

Arthroscopic labral repair is a very successful procedure to relieve pain and improve function of the shoulder. Complications are relatively uncommon considering the complexity of the surgery.

For more information about labral surgery, click on below tabs.

Recovery from Acromioplasty/Distal Clavicle Excision

Arthroscopic acromioplasty and/or distal clavicle excision consists of removing bony spurs and arthritic bone that can cause shoulder pain. Sometimes, these conditions can also be associated with a tear of the rotator cuff or biceps tendon, which lie underneath the spurs.

For more information about recovery from acromioplasty/distal clavicle excision, click on below tabs.

Click on the topics below to find out more from the Orthopaedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.